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Who Cut the Cheese?

October 2, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 5:49 pm

Pet Talk

By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

 

Who Cut the Cheese?

Do you ever wonder, “Why does my pet have so much gas?”

Years ago I had a cat named Marcel. We would all be sitting in the family room and all of a sudden this disgusting aroma would drift my way.  I had to ask my husband was that you are the cat? Fact is some pets are just more flatulent that others. So why is so much nasty gas coming out of the business end of nature’s most efficient composter?

 

Here is a short list of possibilities:

  • Eating food too quickly causes excess air ingestion.
  • Chewing certain toys or rawhide-style chewies may cause chronic, inappropriate ingestion of air.

Too much gas production inside the digestive tract

(bacteria, the gut’s co-digesters, cause the release of gas during digestion)

  • Dietary intolerances
  • Food allergies (sometimes it’s not just the skin that is affected)
  • Bacterial overgrowths secondary to dietary indiscretion (garbage eating, etc.)
  • Chronic bowel diseases (parasitism and cancer)
  • Pancreatic disorders

Flatulence (passing gas) is 100 percent normal and physiologically appropriate in most cases but too much gas or excess stink needs to be checked out by your veterinarian. To determine causes for excess gas, stool checks, blood work, X-rays, and ultrasound are standard methods of diagnosis.  But sometimes Endoscopy, abdominal exploratory surgery, and CT scans are required to get to the bottom of the problem.

 

Here are some Vet-Approved tips for resolving gas in dogs and cats.

 

  • Your pet maybe intolerant of certain proteins and/or carbohydrates. So eliminating ingredients one by one every eek is a good approach, or picking out a new, lower residue diet may help. Your vet can help you make a food selection.

 

  • Feed smaller meals more often.

Some pets are just pigs and gulping mouthfuls of air along with their food can cause gas.

  • Probiotics/Prebiotics

These may improve your pet’s digestive health b increasing numbers of beneficial bacteria in the gut.

 

  • Charcoal

Apparently, some gastrointestinally-focused internal medicine specialist like to use charcoal tablets to speed the nasty bacteria through the GI tract.

 

If your pet has a gas problem please consult with your regular veterinarian.  If you have questions about gas please contact Dr Norette L. Underwood of Trumann Animal Clinic and Best Friends Vet Mobile Service at catdoc56@gmail.com or 870-483-6275.



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