Latest Posts

Daylight Savings Time and your Pets!

October 30, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 9:28 pm

Pet Talk
By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

Daylight Savings Time and your Pets!

Daylight Savings Time officially ends November 5th at 2 AM. (Don’t forget to turn your clocks back an hour!) For most of us that means we get an extra hour of sleep and relaxation before starting the day. Did you know that pets can be affected by the time change as well?

Dogs and cats don’t use watches, but they can tell when there is a change in their owner’s behavior.

Much of a pets behavior is linked to our schedules. Your dog might get up when you do, and learn to ask to go outside at a certain point in the morning routine. They might even learn other behaviors depending on yours. (One client of mine, a little Boston Terrier named Rez, has learned to go back to bed when she sees her owner picking up her purse to leave. Aren’t dogs smart?) 

Dogs thrive on schedules. Cats are more flexible. When those schedules are disrupted it can cause changes in their behavior. An extra hour in bed for you might mean your dog wakes up at the same time needing to go to the bathroom or to eat breakfast. If you’re not careful it can seem like you woke up to a dog who has lost all their training. 
Keep a close eye on your dog or cat for any changes in their behavior after the time change. If they seem to be more anxious or are having more accidents than normal, try getting up an hour earlier and seeing if the behavior continues. Of course, you might get lucky and have a dog or cat who will appreciate the extra hour of sleep, too.

If you have questions about pet care contact Dr. Underwood of the Trumann Animal Clinic at catdoc56@gmail.com



Halloween Safety Tips

October 23, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 8:06 pm

pet talk

Pet Talk

By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

 

Halloween Safety Tips

No Scaredy Cats This Halloween: Top 10 Safety Tips for Pet Parents

Attention, animal lovers, it’s almost the spookiest night of the year! The ASPCA recommends taking some common sense precautions this Halloween to keep you and your pet saying “trick or treat!” all the way to November 1.

  1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause serious life threating problems.
  2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach.
  3. Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.
  4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.
  5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it, wearing a costume may cause undue stress.
  6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana.
  7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.
  8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets. Also please make sure if you own a black cat to put it up on Halloween.
  9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside.
  10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increasing the chances that he or she will be returned to you.

 

If you have questions about Halloween and pets contact Dr. Norette L. Underwood of Trumann Animal Clinic at catdoc56@gmail.com



Leaf Piles, Labs and other Dogs!

October 16, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 6:40 pm

Pet Talk

By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

 

Leaf Piles, Labs and other Dogs!

 

Fall is here! Such a beautiful time of colorful falling leaves and leaf piles.  Labradors, kids and many other dogs love to play in piles of leaves.  There are hidden dangers lurking in piles of leaves such as sticks, twigs, and debris.

 

One of the most common injuries can be a wound to the cornea.  This is the clear part of the eye that is in front of the colored part of the eye, the iris.  Sticks and small twigs can cut, and cause an abrasion and even poke a hole in this clear part of the eye. Just rustling through the leaves can cause small pieces of leaf debris to get in the eye. This can be very painful and cause your dog to rub and cause irritation to the eye. Your dog could suffer a very serious injury leading to loss of vision or even loss of the eye.

 

Dogs can sprain a foot or leg by jumping into the leaf pile.  Running and turning and rolling in the leaves can cause undo stress on the joints and also cause muscle strain.

 

Large sticks can puncture the skin and sometimes go into the chest or abdomen.  These can be a very serious injury and require immediate veterinary attention.

 

Sometimes your dog may have a stick get in their foot causing a puncture wound that can get infected. Leaf pile injuries are not an everyday occurrence but as an owner you should be aware that they could happen.  Let your dog play in the leaves but check the pile first for large sticks, twigs with ends poking out and glass or other foreign objects.  Have a Happy Autumn with your best friend frolicking in the leaves!

 

If you have questions about pet care contact Dr. Norette L. Underwood of the Trumann Animal Clinic and Best Friends Vet Mobile Service at catdoc56@gmail.com



Should I Wake My Dog while Dreaming?

October 9, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 7:24 pm

Pet Talk

By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

 

Should I Wake My Dog while Dreaming?

 

I had a client who asked me about her dreaming dog. She said her dog does a log of dreaming—you can see her limbs twitching and she often emits little cries.  It looks like she is in distress.  Should I wake her at those times to relieve her of the anxiety she may be experiencing?

 

What she is describing does not sound like a nightmare or bad dream.  Good dreams for dogs often involve twitching and soft sounds. Dogs also can twitch more during sleep when they feel cold.  So gently placing a blanket on them may help.

 

If you pet is having somewhat unpleasant dreams consider that just like people, dogs may dream to process things they have experienced, commit new things to memory and work through emotions.  If you interrupt the brain’s working to resolve issues during sleep this will hinder the psychobiology that restores equilibrium to the brain.

 

Some dogs do experience nightmares, where they scream in their sleep and are clearly afraid.  Should you wake a dog in the throes of a nightmare? If your dog is growling or crying or appears distressed during a dream, try to wait it out. Dogs like people, go through cycles in their sleep, including REM cycles.  Letting a nightmare continue and end is part of this natural sleep progression.

 

If your dog is clearly screaming or seems frightfully disturbed, you might consider gently calling their name. Don’t touch a dog to rouse them from a nightmare. You could be bitten.  When they come to reassure them with sweet words and gentle petting.  If this happens regularly consider taking to your veterinarian who can tell you the proper steps to take.



Who Cut the Cheese?

October 2, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 5:49 pm

Pet Talk

By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

 

Who Cut the Cheese?

Do you ever wonder, “Why does my pet have so much gas?”

Years ago I had a cat named Marcel. We would all be sitting in the family room and all of a sudden this disgusting aroma would drift my way.  I had to ask my husband was that you are the cat? Fact is some pets are just more flatulent that others. So why is so much nasty gas coming out of the business end of nature’s most efficient composter?

 

Here is a short list of possibilities:

  • Eating food too quickly causes excess air ingestion.
  • Chewing certain toys or rawhide-style chewies may cause chronic, inappropriate ingestion of air.

Too much gas production inside the digestive tract

(bacteria, the gut’s co-digesters, cause the release of gas during digestion)

  • Dietary intolerances
  • Food allergies (sometimes it’s not just the skin that is affected)
  • Bacterial overgrowths secondary to dietary indiscretion (garbage eating, etc.)
  • Chronic bowel diseases (parasitism and cancer)
  • Pancreatic disorders

Flatulence (passing gas) is 100 percent normal and physiologically appropriate in most cases but too much gas or excess stink needs to be checked out by your veterinarian. To determine causes for excess gas, stool checks, blood work, X-rays, and ultrasound are standard methods of diagnosis.  But sometimes Endoscopy, abdominal exploratory surgery, and CT scans are required to get to the bottom of the problem.

 

Here are some Vet-Approved tips for resolving gas in dogs and cats.

 

  • Your pet maybe intolerant of certain proteins and/or carbohydrates. So eliminating ingredients one by one every eek is a good approach, or picking out a new, lower residue diet may help. Your vet can help you make a food selection.

 

  • Feed smaller meals more often.

Some pets are just pigs and gulping mouthfuls of air along with their food can cause gas.

  • Probiotics/Prebiotics

These may improve your pet’s digestive health b increasing numbers of beneficial bacteria in the gut.

 

  • Charcoal

Apparently, some gastrointestinally-focused internal medicine specialist like to use charcoal tablets to speed the nasty bacteria through the GI tract.

 

If your pet has a gas problem please consult with your regular veterinarian.  If you have questions about gas please contact Dr Norette L. Underwood of Trumann Animal Clinic and Best Friends Vet Mobile Service at catdoc56@gmail.com or 870-483-6275.