Latest Posts

Gecko and Turtle Health

August 14, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 4:27 pm

Pet Talk

By dr. Norette L. Underwood

 

Gecko and Turtle Health

 

Gecko Hunger Strike

 

A friend of mine had a fat-tailed gecko.  He used to eat a few live crickets every few days, but lately he will not touch his food. He just lets the crickets die in his aquarium.

A gecko not wanting to eat is frequently a sign of an underlying health issue.  You should make an appointment to see your vet to rule out infections or other medical issues.  Your gecko’s environment may be off.  It is important that proper heating, lighting and humidity are correct.  The ideal home is a tank with a warm side heated to 90 degrees and cooler side in the high 70’s.  It is also important to keep the tank clean. Remove uneaten crickets or other insects after 30 minutes. If left in the tank, they can pick up parasites from your pet’s poop and make your gecko sick if he does eventually eat them.

 

Turtles and Sunlight:

 

A client asked me if there was a correlation between the amount of sunlight and her turtle’s appetite.  Yes there is.  When the lighting or environmental temperature range is not correct for a species it can have trouble digesting food and not want to eat.  All indoor turtles should have access to full-spectrum (UVA-UVB) lighting during the day. The light source should be 8-12 inches from your turtle and not shine through glass or plastic.  Some reptiles do fast seasonally, but loss of appetite can also be a sign of illness.  If your turtle doesn’t eat for more than a few days, have it checked out by your veterinarian.

 

If you have questions about geckos and turtles contact dr. Norette L. Underwood of Trumann Animal Clinic and Best Friends Vet Mobile Service at catdoc56@gmail.com.



Doggie Home Dental Care 101

August 7, 2017 | Filed under: Uncategorized — Trumann Staff @ 7:43 pm

Pet Talk

By Dr. Norette L. Underwood

Doggie Home Dental Care 101

 

Your dog’s teeth are made up of the same components as all other mammal teeth, including yours. Without regular brushing and periodic professional cleanings, a soft, sticky film of bacteria called plaque builds up on your teeth. Eventually, plaque accumulates and hardens into calculus, allowing millions of bacteria to move into your gums and the structures that hold the teeth in place.

WHY DO DOGS NEED DENTAL CARE?

Many people think dogs don’t need dental care because they come from wolves, and wild animals like wolves don’t have their teeth brushed or scaled. While that’s true, keep in mind that not only is a wolf’s diet different from what our pets eat, but the shape of a dog’s mouth, the size of its teeth, and the way they all fit together are also different. The size and shape of dogs’ mouths vary depending on their breed. The teeth of many canine breeds are crowded compared with wolves’ teeth because dogs have a smaller jaw and a more rounded face. What’s more, our dogs live longer than their wild ancestors, who don’t often live long enough to experience severe dental disease. The fact is that up to 85% of pets have periodontal disease by the time they reach age 3. And, as in people, this results in bad breath, painful chewing, and tooth loss. We know home dental care is a commitment, but it’s not as hard or time-consuming as you might think. Just follow these simple guidelines and see what you can achieve.

READY, SET, BRUSH! It’s best to start a dental care routine with clean teeth, such as when adult teeth first come in or after a professional dental cleaning. If you can already see tartar at your dog’s gum line, realize that brushing may impede the tartar’s destructive process but won’t remove the tartar itself.

Ideally, dogs’ teeth should be brushed every day, but any brushing is better than none. The process should not be a struggle for you or your pet, so take it slow, offer lots of praise, and have fun while improving your dog’s health.

Preparing:  The best brush to use is one with soft bristles that you can hold at an angle that’s comfortable for both you and your pet.  You can opt to start with a finger toothbrush, which is a piece of textured rubber that you place over your finger to massage your dog’s teeth and gums. Finger brushes allow you to reach the spaces between teeth where bacteria and tartar thrive, particularly in small dogs. You’ll also need to use a toothpaste that’s made just for dogs. Human toothpaste is not meant to be swallowed and  may contain artificial sweeteners that can be harmful to dogs. Canine toothpaste comes in flavors they like, such as chicken and beef.

Brushing:   Put some dog toothpaste on the brush, and let your dog lick it off. Once he looks forward to getting the toothpaste, lift the lips with your fingers and brush the teeth that you can reach easily in the front of the mouth. Don’t worry if you only get a few teeth the first week or so. Once your dog is used to the idea of having his teeth brushed, begin to work the toothbrush like you would your own—over both sides of all the teeth. Realize this may takes weeks to achieve and you may never get your dog to stop trying to chew the brush. Just relax, and do the best you can.

NEVER attempt home care if you think your dog may bite you. Discontinue if your dog growls, snaps, or begins to panic. Call or visit us, and we’ll help find a better way for you to keep your dog’s mouth as healthy as possible.

If you have questions about dental care contact dr. Norette L. Underwood of Trumann Animal Clinic and Best Friends Vet Mobile Service at catdoc56@gmail.com